Quick Answer: Why Is There No Apostrophe In Its?

When should you use its?

Its vs.

It’sRule 1: When you mean it is or it has, use an apostrophe.Examples: It’s a nice day.

Rule 2: When you are using its as a possessive, don’t use the apostrophe.Examples: The cat hurt its paw.

If you wish to respond to another reader’s question or comment, please click its corresponding “REPLY” button..

What are these called in English?

There are 14 punctuation marks that are commonly used in English grammar. They are the period, question mark, exclamation point, comma, semicolon, colon, dash, hyphen, parentheses, brackets, braces, apostrophe, quotation marks, and ellipsis.

What is the difference between S and S?

Both express possession, of course. We use ‘s with singular nouns. For example, “my son’s toys” will be “the toys that belong to my son”. We use only an apostrophe (‘) after plural nouns that end in -s: “my sons’ toys” means that I have more than one son and these are their toys.

Which is or that is?

The clause that comes after the word “which” or “that” is the determining factor in deciding which one to use. If the clause is absolutely pertinent to the meaning of the sentence, you use “that.” If you could drop the clause and leave the meaning of the sentence intact, use “which.”

How do you show possession with apostrophe?

Apostrophe Rules for PossessivesUse an apostrophe + S (‘s) to show that one person/thing owns or is a member of something. … Use an apostrophe after the “s” at the end of a plural noun to show possession. … If a plural noun doesn’t end in “s,” add an apostrophe + “s” to create the possessive form.

Why isn’t there an apostrophe in its?

Here is the explanation: Its is like hers, his, ours, theirs, and yours. These are all pronouns. Possessive pronouns do not have apostrophes. … Because we change the spelling, there is no need to add an apostrophe to show possession.

Which is correct it’s or its?

It’s is a contraction of “it is” or “it has.” Its is a possessive determiner we use to say that something belongs to or refers to something. It’s and its are among the most commonly confused words.

What is the possessive form of its?

This is a common question. Here’s the answer: It’s is a contraction, meaning a shorter or “contracted” form of “it is” or “it has.” (Example: It’s going to rain.) Its is a possessive pronoun meaning, “belonging to it,” or a “quality of it” (Example: The carrier lost its license) or (Example: Its color is red.)

Who is apostrophe?

What do who’s and whose mean? Whose is the possessive form of the pronoun who, while who’s is a contraction of the words who is or who has. However, many people still find whose and who’s particularly confusing because, in English, an apostrophe followed by an s usually indicates the possessive form of a word.

What are the 3 Uses of apostrophe?

The apostrophe has three uses: 1) to form possessive nouns; 2) to show the omission of letters; and 3) to indicate plurals of letters, numbers, and symbols.

Does cars have an apostrophe?

An apostrophe with ‘car’ shows possession. The car’s colour means ‘the colour of the car’, just as Mary’s house means ‘the house of Mary’ or the bag’s handle is broken means ‘the handle of the bag is broken’.

Is there always an apostrophe in its?

When to Use It’s vs. Its. It’s is a contraction and should be used where a sentence would normally read “it is.” the apostrophe indicates that part of a word has been removed. Its with no apostrophe, on the other hand, is the possessive word, like “his” and “her,” for nouns without gender.

Do you use apostrophe for possession?

Explanation: An apostrophe and the letter ‘s’ are used to show possession.It is important to put the apostrophe in the correct place, either before the ‘s’ or after the ‘s’, depending on whether the subject is singular or plural.

What are the 5 examples of apostrophe?

Apostrophe ExamplesTwinkle, twinkle, little star, how I wonder what you are. ( … O holy night! … Then come, sweet death, and rid me of this grief. ( … O, pardon me, thou bleeding piece of earth. ( … Roll on, thou deep and dark blue Ocean – roll! ( … Welcome, O life!More items…•